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PROVIDING ANSWERS, FASTER 

GeneDx’s Xpress testing provides accelerated test results for patients in critical condition who are presenting overlapping symptoms or phenotypes. With a 7-day verbal result and a 14-day written report*, we’re helping deliver answers faster.

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FASTER TEST RESULTS FOR INFORMING DECISIONS

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When a patient presents a rapidly deteriorating clinical status, a fast diagnosis has the power to change the direction of medical management, shorten the length of a hospital stay, reduce healthcare costs, and save lives.1-5

Our dedicated Xpress clinical team of genetic experts is here to discuss your patient’s case before and after you send in samples. Email our team at xpress@genedx.com for personalized support.

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Genetic conditions result in 40%
longer length of stays.6-8

 

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babies in level 4 NICUs have an
unrecognized genetic disorder.9

 

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of rare diseases are genetic or
have genetic subtypes.10

 

WHEN EXPERTISE MATTERS

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ADVANCED DETECTION

By interrogating genes for complex variants, we can identify the underlying causes of conditions that may otherwise be missed.

Applying rigorous and esoteric testing strategies, our expert molecular biologists make sure we report the most accurate result consistently.

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UNPARALLELED DATABASE

Cross-referencing uncertain cases to our database of over one million tests leads to more clarity and diagnoses. As new genetic discoveries are made, we re-review previous cases and report new answers found for patients previously tested.

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INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP

We have a long-standing history of rigorous variant interpretation, supported by hundreds of genetic counselors and MD/PhD scientists with extensive clinical experience and peer-reviewed publications.

See how we're leading the industry

DOWNLOAD INFO

TEST OFFERING

GeneDx Xpress tests include:

  • A dedicated clinical team for provider support
  • Facilitating completion of the test requisition
  • Aiding in the consenting process
  • Shipping of sample collection kits to the provider/hospital and directly to parents
  • A trio-based testing approach to increase diagnostic yields and provide inheritance-based reporting
  • Real-time analysis and reporting
  • Calling the ordering healthcare provider with the verbal report within 7 days*
  • Written test report within 14 days*
  • Phenotype- and inheritance-driven reporting
  • Industry-leading experience supported by a clinical team of genetic experts

TEST NAME

TEST CODE

SAMPLES ACCEPTED

CLINICAL INFORMATION


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TH78 Blood only for proband & parents
  • Genome sequencing has a 15% greater clinical utility than chromosomal microarray11
  • Ability to reanalyze data over time
  • Ability to add on mtDNA testing, when appropriate
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Proband: Blood

Parents: Blood preferred but buccal accepted

  • Ability to reanalyze data over time
  • Ability to add on mtDNA testing, when appropriate
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Proband: Blood

Parents: Blood preferred but buccal accepted

  • Designed for institutions that prefer panel ordering for inpatient
  • Ability to reflex to full exome analysis

 

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WHAT DO THE RESULTS MEAN?

There are 3 possible genetic testing results:

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POSITIVE

A change has been identified in the patient’s DNA that is likely to cause the patient’s symptoms. The healthcare provider may suggest having family members tested to determine their chance of also having affected genes.

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NEGATIVE

No changes in the patient’s DNA were found that explain the patient’s symptoms. It is possible there is a genetic variant not found by this test. The healthcare provider may recommend further testing.

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UNCERTAIN

The test found a change in the DNA, but it is not known whether the specific change is the cause of the patient’s symptoms. In this case, the healthcare provider may want to order additional testing for the patient and/or additional family members.

 

HOW TO ORDER

Our dedicated Xpress team is here to make the ordering process easy for healthcare providers and communicate the results. Start the process by emailing our Xpress team, available 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

 

EMAIL THE XPRESS TEAM

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*Reporting times are typical and begin once the sample(s) are received at the GeneDx lab, but could be extended in situations outside GeneDx's reasonable control

REFERENCES: 1. Soden SE, et al. “Effectiveness of exome and genome sequencing guided by acuity of illness for diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorders.” Sci Transl Med 6(265):265ra168 (2014 Dec 3) doi.org/10.1038/gim.2017.1 2. Stark Z et al. “A prospective evaluation of whole-exome sequencing as a first-tier molecular test in infants with suspected monogenic disorders.” Genet Med. 18(11):1090-1096 (2016 Nov) doi.org/10.1038/gim.2016.1  3. Gubbels CS et al. “Prospective, phenotype-driven selection of critically ill neonates for rapid exome sequencing is associated with high diagnostic yield.” Genet Med. 22(4):736-744 (2020 Apr) doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0708-6  4. Chung et al. “Rapid whole-exome sequencing facilitates precision medicine in paediatric rare disease patients and reduces health care costs.” The Lancet Regional Health-Western Pacific 1 (2020 Jul 24) doi.org/10.1016/j.lanwpc.2020.100001  5. Wang H et al. “Clinical utility of 24-h rapid trio-exome sequencing for critically ill infants.” Npj Genomic Medicine 5(20) (2020 May 5) doi.org/10.1038/s41525-020-0129-0  6. McCandless SE, et al. Am J Hum Genet. 2004; 74(1):121–127.  7. Stevenson DA and Carey JC. Am J Med Genet. 2004; 126A: 393-397.  8. Gonzaludo, et al. Genet Med. 2019; 21(8):1781-1789.  9. Harrison W, Goodman D. Epidemiologic trends in neonatal intensive care, 2007–2012. JAMA Pediatr. 2015;169(9):855–862  10. Bick D, Jones M, Taylor SL, et al Case for genome sequencing in infants and children with rare, undiagnosed or genetic diseases Journal of Medical Genetics Published Online First: 25 April 2019. doi: 10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-106111   11.  Clark et al. NPJ Genom Med. 2018; 3:16